Senators began the first of two session days, or 16-hours total, by submitting written questions for the Chief Justice to ask both the prosecution and defense.

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Senators began the first of two session days, or 16-hours total, by submitting written questions for the Chief Justice to ask both the prosecution and defense.

Senators began the first of two session days, or 16-hours total, by submitting written questions for the Chief Justice to ask both the prosecution and defense. By their dinner break around 6:15pm ET, Senators had submitted more than 50 questions.

RECAP: Beginning last week, the House Impeachment Managers and White House Counsel had three days, respectively, to make their case on whether to impeach President Donald John Trump. Following the close of presentations, Senators are now given 16-hours, over two days, to submit written questions. After the time for questions has run out, the Senate will debate and vote, likely this Friday, on if they will employ subpoenas for new witnesses or evidence.

REACTIONS: Before the Senate convened to submit questions, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) spoke to reporters about if Democrats would consider bringing Hunter Biden as a witness if Senate Republicans would vote in favor of more subpoenas. Schumer said "Hunter Biden is irrelevant and a distraction."

"I thank you for that question" -

Before each question, a Senator would stand and state: "Mr. Chief Justice I send a question to the desk." The Chief Justice then read the written question. The White House Counsel and House Impeachment Managers were given 5-minutes to respond accordingly. Each side often began their response with "I thank you for that question."

QUESTION TO THE HOUSE IMPEACHMENT MANAGERS: Can the Senate render a verdict without testimony from John Bolton and other witnesses?

ANSWER, HOUSE MANAGER ADAM SCHIFF (D-CA):

"The short answer is no."

QUESTION TO THE WH COUNSEL: Is the impeachment standard lower in the House than conviction in the Senate & has the House met its standard?

ANSWER, DEPUTY COUNSEL PATRICK PHILBIN:

"Can it be done in a hurried, half-baked, partisan fashion? They didn’t' even subpoena John Bolton!"

QUESTION TO BOTH THE MANAGERS AND WH COUNSEL: As a matter of law, does it matter if there was a quid pro quo? Is it true quid pro quos' are often used in foreign policy?

FIRST ANSWER, ATTORNEY ALAN DERSHOWITZ:

"The only thing that would make a quid pro quo unlawful would be if the 'quo' were, in some way, illegal."

SECOND ANSWER, MANAGER ADAM SCHIFF (D-CA):

"Some of you said earlier 'if they could prove a quid pro quo over the military, now that would be something.' Well, we have. So now the argument shifts to 'all quid pro quos' are just fine, they're all the same.'"

QUESTION TO THE WH COUNSEL: Did President Trump mention the Bidens before Joe Biden entered the 2020 race?

ANSWER, DEPUTY COUNSEL PATRICK PHILBIN:

“I can’t point to something in the record that shows President Trump at an earlier time mentioning specifically something related to Joe or Hunter Biden."

To see all the questions, follow the points of interest here.

Outside the chambers -

MINORITY LEADER CHUCK SCHUMER (D-NY) again addressed the upcoming vote on witnesses, saying "We've always known it will be an uphill fight on witnesses and on documents."

FROM THE PRESIDENT:

THE PRESIDENT signed the United States-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement from the White House lawn and did not remark on the impeachment proceedings.

NEXT STEPS:

The Senate will finish their second round of questions tomorrow, Thursday, Jan. 30. Following the end of questions, the Senate will then debate and vote on whether to subpoena new witnesses and documents. If no new evidence is agreed to, the Senate will then vote to impeach or acquit the president.